Get Out (2017)

Get Out has a charismatic lead, a terrific soundtrack, and damn good cinematography. While it’s described as horror/comedy, it’s more disturbing/cringe-y than scary, and I mean that in a good way. This is an entertaining movie that’s also pretty effective as social commentary.

The film stars Daniel Kaluuya as Chris, a photographer who’s about to spend the weekend at his girlfriend Rose’s (Allison Williams) parent’s house. Naturally, it’s in a secluded spot in the woods. When they get there, the awkwardness that might be expected from a first-time meeting gives way to a series of bizarre behaviors and interactions. While Chris initially takes it all in stride, it eventually becomes clear that there’s something sinister going on behind the scenes.

The acting and dialogue are highlights of the film, as is the camera work. In particular, Kaluuya’s eyebrows and head tilts are so expressive that the audience knows what’s going on in his head even as he politely brushes off eccentricities. Also, Chris and Rose’s everyday banter contrasts sharply with the speech patterns of all the other black people that Chris meets at the house. Then there’s the barely concealed hostility of Rose’s brother, that guy who played Banshee in X-Men: First Class, couched in terms of martial arts schools. Their interaction is just one of the many, many instances of subtext that steadily ratchets up the tension throughout the movie. As for the camera work, it’s so good that in one scene I physically leaned back in my chair to get away from the screen. Aaaahhhh!!!

The ending was perfect. It followed all the right beats of a horror film, with a couple of twists thrown in that had the audience nodding in approval.

This is a short review because you see, I spoiled the film for myself and deeply, deeply regret it. So I shall say no more except to encourage you, duckling, to check it out.

TL;DR: Get Out is excellent both on a technical level and as a “social horror” project. Recommended!

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